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Raise a little hell for Hellbenders

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Raise a little hell for Hellbenders

Raise a Little Hell 

“Raise a Little Hell” by the Canadian rock band Trooper became my childhood rally song and motivated me to stand-up to bullies. A part of my heart still roots for the underdog, and in this case, the Hellbender Salamander, sometimes referred to as the “devil dog”. Though some populations remain healthy, the Hellbender is listed as Near Threatened by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and is close to qualifying for Vulnerable status, mainly due to habitat loss and degradation.  Raise some hell and donate today.


Give a Dam 

While many large dams in North America deliver invaluable services—like critical water supplies, clean hydroelectric power, reduced flood risks and recreational opportunities—many more no longer serve their intended purpose and create serious safety and environmental concerns. Globally and in the United States, dams and levees are among the greatest threats to river and wetland health, including the Hellbender. The removal of dams restores the natural flows and conditions of rivers, as well as the benefits they provide. Hellbenders have been around for more than 150 million years so let’s lower some dams and give these devil dogs a chance to thrive.   

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When
Saturday November 14th

Story

Raise a Little Hell 

“Raise a Little Hell” by the Canadian rock band Trooper became my childhood rally song and motivated me to stand-up to bullies. A part of my heart still roots for the underdog, and in this case, the Hellbender Salamander, sometimes referred to as the “devil dog”. Though some populations remain healthy, the Hellbender is listed as Near Threatened by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and is close to qualifying for Vulnerable status, mainly due to habitat loss and degradation.  Raise some hell and donate today.


Give a Dam 

While many large dams in North America deliver invaluable services—like critical water supplies, clean hydroelectric power, reduced flood risks and recreational opportunities—many more no longer serve their intended purpose and create serious safety and environmental concerns. Globally and in the United States, dams and levees are among the greatest threats to river and wetland health, including the Hellbender. The removal of dams restores the natural flows and conditions of rivers, as well as the benefits they provide. Hellbenders have been around for more than 150 million years so let’s lower some dams and give these devil dogs a chance to thrive.   

Posted by Cheryl Rossman