Why Fundraising Recruitment Using Email Is a Game Changer

Do you have a list of supporters who could make incredible peer-to-peer supporters? If so, you’re at a great starting point. By identifying your audience, you’ve also defined a clear goal for your email campaign: get new peer-to-peer supporters. Fundraising recruitment using email doesn’t have to be complex. Within this guide, we’ll walk you through a proven three-email sequence and deliver actionable instructions for crafting your perfect email. Our goal is to help you spark enough interest in your supporters that they’ll be eager to start their own peer-to-peer fundraisers.

The first email of your campaign

In this first email, your focus is thanking your supporter for the good work they’ve done to date, and encouraging them to get involved even more. Note that the line, “Go here to learn more and get started,” should include a link to your fundraiser page.

Subject: John x Your Nonprofit’s Name

Hi John,

From one volunteer to another, I can’t tell you how amazing it has been to have you as a supporter. I want to ask—has the time you’ve given to volunteering been rewarding for you? Have you ever wondered about other ways you might be able to add value to the mission?

I’m asking because I have a way for you to connect with our cause in a fun and impactful way. We’re encouraging people to try something new and create their own personal fundraiser—and I think it’s a perfect fit for you.

When you create a personal fundraiser, you’ll get to show the world what our shared mission means to you personally, and you’ll help our organization in two important ways: new donations and increased awareness. And we’ll supply you with all the tips and resources you’ll need to be successful.

Sound interesting? Go here to learn more and get started.

Thank you.

Your first name, last name

Title

Your nonprofit’s name

Yourwebsite.org

Subject Lines

Getting your supporters to open your email is the first step. In our experience, the secret to great performing subject lines is to keep them short and personalized. This makes sense for a lot of reasons, but it primarily boils down to people being busy. Something too long or not specifically relevant to them isn’t worth their time. Short and personal subject lines solve for both.

Example: John x Your Nonprofit’s Name

Example: John Smith x Your Nonprofit’s Name

Example: John & Your Nonprofit’s Name

Things to avoid

There are also some practices to avoid when it comes to writing subject lines. These may sound like no-brainers, but you’d be surprised how often some version of them end up in the final copy.

  • Don’t write a subject line that reads like a newsletter. Keep it short and save the details for the email body.
  • Second, in no way should you be misleading or deceptive. Sometimes an urgent or important subject line may get more clicks, but once your supporters realize the content of the email isn’t as urgent or important to them as the subject line might have implied, you’ll lose their trust and interest.

Email body text

The lead sentence or sentences in the email body are the most important in the email. Your goal with the opening lines is to create value by speaking directly to your supporters in a personal way.

Maybe they’re a dedicated volunteer, or maybe they’re a recurring donor. By speaking to their personal experience, you make it initially about them, which will spark their interest. The more it can be specifically addressed to them, the better. We also recommend trying to connect with them on any shared experiences you may have.

Example:

“Hi John,

From one volunteer to another, I can’t tell you how amazing it’s been to have you as a supporter. Has the time you’ve given volunteering been rewarding for you? Have you ever wondered about other ways you might be able to add value to the mission?”

Second paragraph text

Our goal in the second paragraph is to communicate the value of creating a fundraiser to your supporters. It’s important to make sure you keep your supporters in mind and outline how this will benefit them. The value we’re offering John here is a new, fun way to connect with the cause.

Example:

“I’m asking because I have a way for you to connect with our cause in a fun and impactful way. We’re encouraging people to try something new and create their own personal fundraising campaign—I think it’s a perfect fit for you.”

Third paragraph text

The third paragraph gives just a little more detail and acts as a lead into the call-to-action. The goal here is not to overwhelm the reader, but simply provide them with the most basic set of details that make them want to dig in a little deeper.

Example:

“When you create a personal fundraiser, you’ll get to show the world what our shared mission means to you personally and you’ll help our organization in two important ways: new donations and increased awareness. We’ll also supply you with all the tips and resources you’ll need to be successful.” 

Call-to-action

The call-to-action Immediately follows the third paragraph. You’ll want this to be specific and related to your fundraising goal: get the supporter to learn more and take action.

In this case, we want them to see the resources, campaign ideas, and successful personal fundraiser examples. The best practice is to link ‘Go here’ to a high quality peer-to-peer or DIY landing page.

The call-to-action should be simple and to the point. For example: “Sound interesting? Go here to learn more and get started.”

The footer

The footer is very straightforward: name, title, and organization name. It’s always a best practice to include a link to your website as well.

Example:

Your first name, last name

Title

Your nonprofit’s name

yourwebsite.org

Next steps: creating a follow-up

Your first email is definitely the most important message in the email campaign. Hopefully, you’ll bring in new supporters who want to learn peer-to-peer and create fundraisers—but you should still be ready with great, informative follow-ups if they don’t take action.

It’s important that you mix up the type of content you’re sending with each follow-up. Sending a series of emails that repeats the same ideas over and over won’t be effective. Additionally, follow-ups should always reference the emails that came before.

The Second email of your campaign

You’ll want to send the second email one week after sending the first email. Here’s an example of what a second email could look like:

Subject: Re: John x Your Nonprofit’s Name

John,

I messaged you a few days ago about creating a personal fundraiser benefiting our organization. I wanted to take a moment to follow up a little more about the impact you’d have by joining the campaign.

When we first found Rosy, she was abandoned and left tied to a tree. $200 was all it took to get this pup the medical aid she needed and help find her a loving forever home. Three years later she’s healthy, happy, and loved.

John, we encounter situations like this on a daily basis. We’re asking supporters to raise $200 in personal fundraising. That’s just $20 from 10 friends and, as a result, can deliver the same kind of lasting impact to another animal.

Create your fundraiser now.

Thank you,

Your first name

The third email of your campaign 

Plan on sending the third email six days after your second email.

Subject: Re: John x Your Nonprofit’s Name

John,

I know life is hectic, so I wanted to follow up with a reminder about creating a personal fundraiser to support our mission.

Would you consider checking out our fundraising toolkit to get an idea of how easy we make it to be successful at personal fundraising?

We have resources for different types of communication—whether you prefer to send your fundraising to friends and family by email, social media, phone calls, or word of mouth. 

Check out the toolkit and get started.

Thank you,

Your first name

Encourage peer-to-peer support through emails right now

On GoFundMe Charity, you can create your own peer-to-peer fundraising platform that integrates seamlessly with your website. We can help you build high-quality landing pages for your peer-to-peer and DIY fundraising programs, just like we have for the American Cancer Society, the American Red Cross, and many more world-class nonprofits. Sign up for GoFundMe Charity today and start spreading the word about peer-to-peer fundraising to your supporters.

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